Group Leader

Matthew Bogyo
Professor
mbogyo[at]stanford.edu
Ph.D. MIT
B.S. Bates College
Curriculum Vitae
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Biography: Dr. Bogyo received his Ph.D. in Chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1997. After completion of his degree he was appointed as a Faculty Fellow in the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Bogyo served as the Head of Chemical Proteomics at Celera Genomics from 2001 to 2003 while maintaining an Adjunct Faculty appointment at UCSF. In the Summer of 2003 Dr. Bogyo joined the Department of Pathology at Stanford Medical School and was appointed as a faculty member in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology in 2004. His interests are focused on the use of chemistry to study the role of proteases in human disease. In particular his laboratory is currently working on understanding the role of cysteine proteases in tumorgenesis and also in the life cycle of the human parasites, Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii. Dr. Bogyo currently serves on the Editorial Board of Biochemical Journal, Chemistry and Biology. Molecular and Cellular Proteomics and is an Academic Editor at PLoS One. Dr. Bogyo is a consultant for several biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies in the Bay Area.


Postdoctoral Fellows
Ouma Onguka
Postdoctoral Fellow
oonguka1[at]stanford.edu
Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University
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Biography:
Brett Babin
Postdoctoral Fellow
bbabin[at]stanford.edu
Ph.D. Caltech
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Biography:
Chris Schulze
Postdoctoral Fellow
cjschulz[at]stanford.edu
Ph.D. University of California, Santa Cruz
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Biography:Chris received his Bachelor's of Science degree, summa cum laude, in marine biology from the University of North Carolina, Wilmington in 2008. He then shifted his academic focus towards chemistry and began his Ph.D. work in organic chemistry at the University of California, Santa Cruz under Dr. Roger G. Linington. His thesis focused on the discovery of novel antiparasitic and anticancer lead compounds from marine microbially-derived natural product libraries, as well as the development of a phenotypic image-based screening platform in cancer for mode of action profiling of natural product libraries. Chris was awarded his Ph.D. in 2013 and joined the Bogyo Lab in early 2014. His current research focuses on the development of bicyclic peptide ABPs in cancer using phage display, and screening electrophilic protease inhibitor libraries against viral targets.
Neri Amara
Postdoctoral Fellow
neriam[at]stanford.edu
Ph.D. Ben Gurion University, Negev, Israel
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Biography:Dr. Amara received his Bachelors of Science degree in Chemistry in 2007 from the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. He pursued an integrated program completing his M.Sc and Ph.D. degree under the supervision of Prof. Michael M. Meijler at the Ben-Gurion Univerity of the Negev. His thesis focused on the synthesis of novel covalent inhibitors of quorum sensing for the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. He joined the Bogyo lab in January 2014 and is currently studying the application of activity-based probes combined with genome editing to image and characterize the biological roles of matrix metallo-proteases.
Christian Lentz
Postdoctoral Fellow
clentz[at]stanford.edu
Ph.D. University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany
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Biography: Dr. Lentz received a Diploma degree (equivalent to M.Sc.) in Molecular Biomedicine from the University of Bonn, Germany in 2009. During his diploma thesis at the Institute of Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology in Bonn, Germany he studied the role of eosinophils during experimental filarial infection. He then joined the working group of Dr. Kenneth Pfarr/ Prof. Achim Hoerauf at the same institute for his Ph.D. project for which he worked in close collaboration with the Chemical Biology Unit of the LIMES-Institute in Bonn (working group of Prof. Michael Famulok). His Ph.D. thesis focused on the target-based discovery of novel inhibitors of enzymatic targets of the Wolbachia endosymbiotic bacteria of parasitic filarial nematodes. Having been awarded his Ph.D. (Dr. rer. nat.) degree in May 2013, he continued his work in the Pfarr/Hoerauf Lab as a postdoc for several months before he joined the Bogyo Lab as a postdoctoral research fellow of the German Research Foundation (DFG) in March 2014. His current work focuses on the development of a phage-display-based methodology to generate selective activity-based probes for protease targets from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and their translation to and application as noninvasive imaging tools for tuberculosis infection.
Ian Foe
Postdoctoral Fellow
ifoe[at]stanford.edu
Ph.D. University of California, San Francisco

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Biography:In 2004 Ian graduated from the University of California at Davis with a Bachelors of Science in biology. In 2006 he started his graduate work at the University of California at San Francisco and in 2007 joined Dr. David Toczyski’s lab. In Dr. Toczyski’s lab, Ian investigated how the Anaphase Promoting Complex (APC) is regulated in mitosis. His work showed that one the APC’s mitotic activators (Cdc20) is ubiquitinated by the Anaphase Promoting Complex (APC). He showed that Cdc20 is turned over by three distinct mechanisms; the previously suggested Cdh1trans mechanism, a novel Cdc20trans mechanism, and a novel in cis Cdc20 auto-ubiquitination mechanism. In addition, Ian showed that the in cis mechanism is the most important mechanism for Cdc20 turnover and is regulated through the cell cycle. In 2012, Ian graduated from UCSF and joined the Bogyo lab in 2013. In the Bogyo Lab, Ian studies how a palmitoylation (a lipid posttranslational modification) regulates host cell invasion by the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii.
Euna Yoo
Postdoctoral Fellow
eunay[at]stanford.edu
Ph.D. University of Kansas

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Biography:Euna received a Bachelor of Science degree in Pharmacy in 2007 and Master of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences in 2009 under the guidance of Dr. Hea-Young Park Choo working on synthesis and evaluation of serotonin receptor antagonists at Ewha Womans University, South Korea. In 2010 she started her Ph.D. work in Medicinal Chemistry at the University of Kansas, Lawrence and joined Dr. Sunil David’s laboratory. Her thesis focused on the exploration of Toll-like receptor 7 and 8 agonists to understand the mechanism of innate immune response and develop potential vaccine adjuvants. She was awarded her Ph.D. in 2015 and joined the Bogyo group in July of 2015.
Shiyu Chen
Postdoctoral Fellow
shiyu[at]stanford.edu
B.Sc. Nanjing University, China
Ph.D. École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland
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Biography:Shiyu received his bachelor degree of science in analytical chemistry from Nanjing University, China in 2005. He then moved to Shanghai Institute of Material Medica in Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai and finished his master degree in 2009. Afterwards, he continued his PhD study in the laboratory of Dr Christian Heinis at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland. His thesis projects were focused on the development of new formats of bicyclic peptides and their application in phage display. He has developed serveral bicyclic peptide linkers that can be widely applied in phage selection and also several new non-natural amino acids (di-thiol amino acids) for generating new formats of bicyclic peptides. Shiyu was awarded his doctorate degree in 2013. After one year postdoc in the same group, he joined the Bogyo Lab in 2015. In his current project, Shiyu will apply bicyclic peptide phage display technique to generate selective and potent activity based probes for imaging purposes.

 

Martina Tholen
Postdoctoral Fellow
mtholen[at]stanford.edu
B.Sc. Georg-August-Universität Göttingen
Ph.D. Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg
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Sebastian Loscher
Postdoctoral Fellow
slocher[at]stanford.edu
B.Sc. Universitat Stuttgart
Ph.D. Universitat Bayreuth
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Graduate Students

Josh Yim
Graduate Student, Chemical and Systems Biology
joshyim[at]stanford.edu
B.A. Cornell University
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Biography: Josh graduated from Cornell University in 2010 with a Bachelor of Arts (magna cum laude) in Chemistry. His undergraduate research with Dr. Frank Schroeder focused on the total synthesis of the Caeliferins, a plant natural product, and mechanistic studies of long-chain cross metathesis via 2D NMR. After graduation, he spent three years working as a research assistant in the Schroeder lab, synthesizing nematode-derived secondary metabolites. Afterwards, he spent one year with Dr. Ralf Sommer at the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology in Germany studying the natural variation of small molecule biosynthesis in nematodes. Before starting graduate studies at Stanford, Josh spent his summer at Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research (NIBR) as a ChEM-H pre-graduate intern, synthesizing chemical tool compounds to understand biochemical details of enzyme function for oncology targets. In the Bogyo lab, Josh is interested in using chemical probes to image and study mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions.

 

Laura Sanman
Graduate Student, Chemical and Systems Biology
lsanman[at]stanford.edu
B.A., The Ohio State University
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Biography: Laura graduated from The Ohio State University in 2011 with a Bachelor of Science (with research distinction) in Biochemistry. She began undergraduate research doing field work studying Central Ohio rivers, and then did an internship in surfactant process R&D at Procter and Gamble. Her undergraduate thesis with Dr. Zucai Suo involved using pre-steady state kinetic assays and sequencing assays to characterize human DNA polymerases involved in DNA damage and repair. In the Bogyo lab, Laura is developing chemical tools to study cell death and initiation of inflammation by innate immune cells.

Megan Garland
Graduate Student, MSTP, Cancer Biology
garlandm[at]stanford.edu
B.A. Boston University
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Biography: Megan graduated from Boston University in 2012 with a Bachelor of Arts (with research distinction) in Chemistry with a specialization in Biochemistry, and Neuroscience. Her undergraduate research with Dr. Karen Allen focused on structural determination of enzymes in the haloalkanoate dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily via X-ray crystallography. Megan spent two years working part-time in the Bogyo lab while attending medical school at Stanford before joining the lab full time in June 2014. Her current work in the Bogyo lab is focused on the human protein DJ-1.


Lab Managers

Undergraduate Students


Research Consultant

Mark Rice
Research Consultant
mjrice[at]stanford.edu
B.S.E. U.W. Seattle
Ph.D. U.C. Berkeley
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Biography: Dr. Rice received his bachelors degrees in Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering at the University of Washington in Seattle. At the University of California, Berkeley, he completed his Ph.D. studies working on computational studies on the catalytic activity of zeolites. Since 1999, he has worked as a computation chemist, supporting structure based drug design at Axys Pharmaceuticals (acquired by Celera) and Millenium Pharmaceuticals. In the Bogyo lab, Dr. Rice is offering computational and modeling support on several protease projects.


Former Lab Members
Wouter van der Linden
Postdoctoral Fellow
vdlinden[at]stanford.edu
Ph.D. University of Leiden, The Netherlands

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Biography:In 2007 Wouter received his Doctorandus degree (equivalent to Master of Science) with honors from Leiden University, The Netherlands. His thesis focused on the synthesis and biological evaluation of activity-based proteasome profiling tools.  He then commenced his PhD research in 2007 in the lab of Prof. Dr. H.S. Overkleeft at Leiden University. His thesis describes the synthesis and biological evaluation of inhibitors specific for the different catalytic activities of the proteasome.  In 2011 he was awarded his doctors degree and briefly continued his research in the Overkleeft lab as a postdoc. He joined the Bogyo lab in October 2012 and is working on the synthesis of specific and broad spectrum cathepsin inhibitors for use in parasitic diseases and cancer..

Hao Li
Graduate Student, Chemical and Systems Biology
hli9[at]stanford.edu
B.S. University of Wisconsin-Madison
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Biography: Hao Li graduated from University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2008 with a Bachelor of Science (with honors) degree in Biochemistry and Biology. Her undergraduate research in Dr Michael Cox's group focused on the RecA protein involved in DNA damage response in E.coli, and directed evolution of radiation resistant E.coli. After graduation, she spent a year in a natural product synthesis laboratory in Singapore headed by Dr David Chen and worked on synthesizing analogues of a novel antimicrobial compound-platencin. Her current work in the Bogyo group is mainly focused on the P. faciparum proteasome.
Matthew Child
Postdoctoral Fellow
machild[at]stanford.edu
B.Sc. Cardiff University
Ph.D. University College London
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Biography:Matthew received a Bachelors of Science degree with Honors in Genetics from Cardiff University in 2005. He then worked with Professor Liz Smythe at Sheffield University studying the molecular interactions involved in receptor-mediated endocytosis. Following 7 months travelling around the world he began a PhD in the laboratory of Dr Mike Blackman at the National Insitute for Medical Research (NIMR), London, UK in 2006. His thesis project examined the trafficking and function of the malarial sheddase PfSUB2, which he completed and was awarded his doctorate degree by University College London in 2009. He briefly continued his studies at the NIMR as a post-doctoral research scientist, before joining the Bogyo Lab in June 2010. Matthew now works on the DJ-1 protein of Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium spp, the P. falciparum cysteine protease Falcipain-1, and mammalian caspases.

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Tina Oresic Bender
Postdoctoral Fellow
koresic[at]stanford.edu
B.S. University of Zagreb, Croatia
Ph.D. University of Ljubljana, Slovenia
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Biography:Kristina’s completed a B.Sc. in Molecular Biology at the University of Zagreb, Croatia and then earned a Ph.D. from the University of Ljubljana, School of Medicine, Slovenia. She completed the majority of her studies for her Ph.D. work in the laboratory of Dr. Domenico Tortorella in the Department of Microbiology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York. Her research has been focused on the exploration of molecular pathways in various human pathologies from infectious diseases to cancer, with the unifying factor being the understanding of how disruption of proteolysis contributes to the development of disease-related conditions. For her Ph.D. work, she investigated how human cytomegalovirus evades the immune response via targeting MHC class I for ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation. Her current research at the Bogyo lab is aimed towards development of high-throughput screens to identify inhibitors for C. difficile toxin B protease as non-antibiotic therapeutics. She is also developing and validating tools for non-invasive imaging of Cathepsin S protease activity during tumorogenesis.
Nimali Withana
Postdoctoral Fellow
nwithana[at]stanford.edu
Ph.D. University of Melbourne, Australia

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Biography:Nimali received a Bachelors of Science degree in Molecular Medicine from the University of Auckland, New Zealand in 1999, followed by a Masters degree in Immunology in 2002. After completing her Masters she decided to broaden her knowledge and expertise by working in a biotechnology company. At ViaLactia Biosciences Ltd, New Zealand she was responsible for gene cloning and sequencing projects that supported the Plant Functional Genomics program. Her desire to further challenge herself coupled with her strong interest in medical research brought her to the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia for a PhD position (2012) in Dr. Robin Anderson’s laboratory, to study the molecular mechanisms of breast cancer spread and to identify new specific targets for therapy. In choosing the Bogyo laboratory for her post-doctoral studies, she intends to broaden her knowledge of the application of activity-based probes as potential diagnostic tools in cancer and lung fibrosis.

Leslie Ofori
Postdoctoral Fellow
lofori[at]stanford.edu
Ph.D. University of Rochester, Rochester, NY

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Biography: Leslie received his bachelor science degree with honors from the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi Ghana in 2006. He then worked as an undergraduate teaching assistant in the chemistry department for a year. In 2007 he moved to Rochester NY, where he began his doctoral studies in the laboratory of Dr. Benjamin Miller at the Department of Chemistry at the University of Rochester, New York. His doctoral dissertation was focused on the design of small molecules for selective targeting of HIV frameshift stimulatory RNA and abnormal RNA repeats in myotonic dystrophy. In December 2012, he joined the Bogyo lab as a postdoctoral fellow. He is currently working of the development of chemical probes as tools for non-invasive imaging of elevated protease activity in cancer and as pro-drugs for targeted-delivery of chemotherapy drugs.

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Ehud Segal
Postdoctoral Fellow
ehudsega[at]stanford.edu
B.S. Tel-Hai Academic College, Israel
Ph.D. Tel Aviv University, Israel
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Biography:Dr. Segal received his Bachelors of Science degree in Biotechnology from Tel-Hai Academic College, Israel. In 2004, he completed his Masters studies in the laboratory of Prof. Hanna Ben-Bassat at The Hebrew University, Jerusalem Israel. His thesis work focused on experimental model of bio-engineered skin. In 2008 he completed his Ph.D. research in the group of Prof. Ronit Satchi-Fainaro at Tel-Aviv University, Israel. His thesis work mainly focused on synthesis and characterization of a novel targeted anticancer therapy for bone-related malignances. He joined the Bogyo Lab in October 2011 and is currently focused on the development of non-invasive imaging tools for imaging subpopulations of macrophages associated with inflammation and cancer.
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Brooke Anderson-White
Postdoctoral Fellow
brookea[at]stanford.edu
B.S. University of Texas at Austin
Ph.D. Boston College
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Biography:Brooke received a B.S. in chemical engineering and a B.A. in Plan II (honors liberal arts) from The University of Texas in 2003, where she developed a mathematical model for the interactions between base quenchers and photogenerated acids in Dr. C. Grant Willson’s lab. After graduation, she joined Trinity Consultants where she worked with several industries on air quality projects. In 2006, Brooke joined the lab of Dr. Marc-Jan Gubbels at Boston College, where she completed her Ph.D. in 2011 on the identification and characterization of the IMC protein family in Toxoplasma gondii. In the Bogyo lab, she is identifying essential serine hydrolases in Plasmodium falciparum. Brooke spends her free time training for triathlons, practicing yoga, and blogging (virulentb.com). Follow her on Twitter @VirulentB..

Chelsea Powell
Undergraduate Research Student
chelseap[at]stanford.edu

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Biography:

Montse Morell
Postdoctoral Fellow
mmorell[at]stanford.edu
B.Sc.
Ph.D.

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Biography:Dr. Morell received her B.S. degree with honours in Chemistry from Autonomus University of Barcelona in 2002. In 2008 she completed her Ph.D. studies in Biotechnology at the same university. Her thesis work focused on the development of protein reporters to study in vivo protein interactions and aggregation. She joined the Bogyo lab in April 2009 and is currently working on the development of activity-based probes for metalloproteases. 

Junpeng Xiao
Postdoctoral Fellow
juxiao[at]stanford.edu
B.S. University of Science and Technology of China
Ph.D. Indiana University
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Biography:Dr. Xiao received his Bachelors of Science degree with honors in polymer chemistry in 2003 from the University of Science and Technology of China. In 2005, he joined Prof. Thomas Tolbert’s research group at Indiana University Bloomington and completed his Ph.D. studies in 2010. His thesis work focused on modulation of protein properties and functions through site-specific protein modification. He was able to utilizing chemical modification to engineer HIV fusion inhibitors with improved potency and engineer antibody fragment Fc for cancer cell targeting. He joined the Bogyo Lab in September 2010 and is currently working on engineering caspases for selective targeting and inhibition of their activity with activity-based probes and inhibitors.

Laura Edgington
Graduate Student, Cancer Biology
laurae1[at]stanford.edu
B.A. Transylvania University
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Biography: .Laura grew up on a dairy goat farm in rural Kentucky. In 1996, Laura received Grand Champion Honors at the American Dairy Goat Association's National Show. In 2002, she decided to leave the farm to pursue undergraduate studies at Transylvania University in Lexington, KY. She double majored in Biology and Chemistry with a minor in French Language and Literature. Upon leaving Transylvania, Laura worked as a research assistant at the Cincinnati Childrens Hopital in the laboratory of Dr. Mitchell Cohen. There, she studied the roles of Guanylyl Cyclase C in hepatocyte proliferation. In 2007, she initiated doctoral studies in the Cancer Biology Program at Stanford and joined the Bogyo Lab. Laura's main research interests lie in developing activity based probes for noninvasive imaging applications and using these tools to dissect functions of cysteine proteases during tumor progression and inflammation.

Juan Carlos Valderramos
Research Associatejuanv2[at]stanford.edu
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Biography:

Aaron Puri
Graduate Student, Chemical and Systems Biology
awpuri[at]stanford.edu
B.A., B.S. University of Chicago
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Biography: Aaron graduated from the University of Chicago in 2004, where he received a B.S. with honors in Biological Chemistry, a B.A. in Biology specializing in Immunology, and a B.A. in Economics. His undergraduate research in Dr. Robert Keenan’s lab focused on developing new chemical biology tools for identifying substrates of N-acyl transferases. In the Bogyo Lab, Aaron’s is developing new chemical tools for studying activation of caspase-1 and the inflammasome.

Edgar Deu Sandoval
Postdoctoral Fellow
edgardeu[at]stanford.edu
B.Sc.
Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley

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Biography: Edgar received a BS in organic chemistry and chemical engineering from the Insitut Quimic de Sarria in Barcelona, Spain, in 2000. He joined the research group of Prof. Jack Kirsch at UC Berkeley in the Fall of 2000, where he earned his PhD degree in Comparative Biochemistry in 2007. Edgar's research as a graduate student focused on the thermodynamic characterization of protein stability and protein-protein interactions of large oligomeric enzymes. He also work on protein engineering projects, and was able to design a hybrid aminotransferase enzyme with dual substrate specificity and allosteric communication between its two active sites. He joined the Bogyo lab in the summer of 2007 and is interested in the development of new antimalarial drugs that inhibit essential protease in the Plasmodium falciparum parasite.

Martijn Verdoes
Postdoctoral Fellow
mverdoes[at]stanford.edu
B.Sc.
Ph.D. University of Leiden

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Biography:Martijn Verdoes received his Bachelors of Science degree in organic chemistry from the Hogeschool Leiden, The Netherlands. He then continued at Leiden University, The Netherlands, where he received his Masters of Science degree in chemistry in 2004. In 2008 he completed his Ph.D. research in the bio-organic synthesis group of Prof.dr. H.S. Overkleeft and Prof.dr. G.A. van der Marel at the Leiden Institute of Chemistry, The Netherlands. His thesis work mainly focused on the design and synthesis of activity-based inhibitors and probes to study proteasome function. He joined the Bogyo Lab in April 2009 and is currently focused on the development of non-invasive imaging tools for inflammation.

Aimee Shen
Postdoctoral Fellow
ashen2[at]stanford.edu
B.S. University of Alberta
Ph.D. Harvard University

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Biography: Dr. Shen received a Bachelors of Science degree with honors in microbiology with a minor in English in 2001 from the University of Alberta. In 2006, she completed her Ph.D. studies in the laboratory of Dr. Darren Higgins at Harvard Medical School. Her thesis work focused on 5'UTR mediated regulation of virulence gene expression and elucidating the molecular mechanism underlying temperature-dependent regulation of flagellar gene expression in the facultative intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. She joined the Bogyo Lab in April 2007 and is currently working on determining how the Apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii inhibits intrinsic apoptotic signaling.

Beth Ponder
Graduate Student, Microbiology and Immunology
eponder[at]stanford.edu
B.S. Lafayette College
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Biography: Elizabeth earned her B.S. degree in Biochemistry from Lafayette College in 2004. Her undergraduate studies focused on the effects of Echinostoma caproni and Schistosoma mansoni parasite infections on simple metabolite profiles in snail intermediate hosts and factors affecting shed parasite survival. Elizabeth enrolled in the Stanford Microbiology and Immunology Ph.D. program in the fall of 2004 and is currently working on a thesis project using small molecule inhibitors to understand the role of cysteine proteases in the life cycle of the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum.

Fangfang Yin
Postdoctoral Fellow
fyin[at]stanford.edu
B.Sc. Anhui University
Ph.D. Cornell Univsersity School of Medicine

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Biography: Dr. Yin received her Bachelor of Science degree with honors in Biochemistry from Anhui University, China in 1999. She completed her doctorate studies at Cornell Medical School in 2008. Her graduate work focused on the in vivo functions of a gene named progranulin in inflammation and neurodegeneration. She joined the Bogyo lab in January 2009 and is currently working on elucidating the roles of proteases in immune responses using mouse models of diseases.

Margot Paulick
Postdoctoral Fellow
mpaulick[at]stanford.edu
B.S. University of Wisconsin-Madison
Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley

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Biography: Margot received her B.S. degree in chemistry from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2000.  She then moved 2000 miles across the country to the University of California-Berkeley where she earned her Ph.D. in chemistry in the laboratory of Professor Carolyn Bertozzi.  During her graduate studies, she developed a chemical approach that enables the investigation of the biological functions of the GPI anchor, a glycolipid structure that anchors modified proteins in the cell membrane.  Margot joined the Bogyo lab in the winter of 2007 and is interested in using activity-based probes to understand the functions of serine proteases involved in cancer.

Paul Bowyer
Postdoctoral Fellow
pwbowyer[at]stanford.edu
B.S.
Ph.D. Imperial College of London

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Biography: Dr. Bowyer received his Masters of Science degree in chemistry with honours in 2001 from Imperial College London during which he completed an industrial year placement at Zeneca Agrochemicals. He completed his Wellcome Trust funded Ph.D, ’Studies on the N-myristoyltransferase of Plasmodium falciparum’ in 2006 under the guidance of Prof. D. Smith, Dr. K. Brown, Prof. R. Leatherbarrow and Prof. A. Holder in the Division of Cell and Molecular Biology at Imperial College London. In March 2007 he joined the Bogyo Lab and is currently working on the cathepsins of Toxoplasma gondii in addition to development of novel chemical probes of protease activity in P. falciparum.

Victoria Albrow
Postdoctoral Fellow
valbrow[at]stanford.edu
B.S. University of Nottingham
Ph.D. University of Nottingham

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Biography: Dr. Albrow received her Masters of Science degree in chemistry with honours in 2002 from The University of Nottingham, England where she also completed her Ph.D. studies in 2006 in the laboratory of Prof. S. Woodward. Her thesis work involved the design and synthesis of novel chiral ferrocenyl ligands and their application in the conjugate addition of organoalanes to enones. She joined the Bogyo Lab in March 2007 and is currently focused on the effects of isocoumarin-based compounds on the Apicomplexan parasite Toxoplsma gondii.

Jiyoun Lee
Postdoctoral Fellow
jiyounlee[at]stanford.edu
B.S./M.S. Seoul National University
Ph.D. Northwestern University

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Biography: Dr. Lee received her Bachelor of Science degree in pharmacy and Masters of Science degree in medicinal chemistry in 2000 under the guidance of Prof. Jeewoo Lee at Seoul National University, Korea. After finishing her Master’s studies on the development of vanilloid receptor ligands as novel analgesics, she joined the laboratory of Prof. Thomas Meade in the department of chemistry at Northwestern University and completed her Ph.D. studies in 2006. Her thesis work focused on the development of transition metal and lanthanide complexes as molecular probes, particularly receptor-targeted MRI contrast agents. After briefly working in the laboratory of Prof. Chris Chang in the department of chemistry at UC Berkeley, she joined the Bogyo lab in December 2007. Her current project involves the development of activity-based probes for lysosomal proteases and their applications for in vivo imaging.

Carolyn Phillips
Graduate Student, Microbiology and Immunology
phillica[at]stanford.edu
B.A. West Virginia Univ.
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Biography: Carolyn earned her B.A. degree in Biology at West Virginia University in 2002. Prior to enrolling at in the Ph.D. program at Stanford in 2003, Carolyn was awarded a pre-IRTA Fellowship to work for 1 year at the NIH . Her project was focused on applying yeast genetics to study protein trafficking. She is currently working on a thesis project in the Bogyo Lab to define the functional roles of cysteine proteases in the human parasite, Toxoplasma gondii using small molecule inhibitors and probes.

Kristjana Ásbjörnsdóttir
Research Associate
k.asbjornsdottir[at]yahoo.com
B.S. Univ. of Iceland
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Biography: Kristjana received her BS in Biochemistry from the University of Iceland in 2005. She did her undergraduate work at the University of Iceland and at Universidade de Coimbra, Portugal, where she was an exchange student under the Erasmus scholarship program. Following graduation, she spent two years in the quality control laboratory at Actavis pharmaceuticals before joining the Bogyo lab in March 2007.

Galia Blum
Postdoctoral Fellow
galia[at]stanford.edu
B.Sc. Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem
Ph.D. Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem
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Biography: Dr. Blum received her B.Sc. in Chemistry from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel 1994. She carried out her doctoral studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, in the laboratory of Professor Alexander Levitzki, for this work she was awarded the Polack prize for excellence in studies and research from the Institute of Life Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Her research focused on Development of potent inhibitors of Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 receptor as anti cancer drugs. Dr. Blum received her Ph.D. in the spring of 2003 and has been a postdoctoral researcher at Stanford University in the laboratory of Professor Matthew Bogyo since this time. Her postdoctoral work involves organic synthesis, protein biochemistry, enzymology and fluorescent imaging to investigate protease activity associated with human pathologies.

Jeong Tae Lee
Postdoctoral Fellow
leo0516[at]stanford.edu
B.S. Hanyang University
Ph.D. University of Texas, Austin

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Zhimou Yang
Postdoctoral Fellow
yangzm[at]stanford.edu
B.S. Nanjing University
Ph.D. Hong Kong Univ. of Sci. & Tech.

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Biography: Dr. Yang received his B.Sc. in Polymer Science from the Nanjing University of Nanjing, China in 2001. He carried out his doctoral studies in the department of Chemistry of the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, in the laboratory of Professor Bing Xu. His research focused on design, synthesis, enzymatic regulation, and biological Applications of molecular hydrogels. Dr. Yang received his Ph.D. in the August of 2006 and now is a postdoctoral researcher at Stanford University in the laboratory of Professor Matthew Bogyo. His postdoctoral work involves in organic synthesis, protein labeling, enzymology and fluorescent imaging to probe protease activity.

Brittany Leader
Undergraduate Researcher
bleader[at]stanford.edu
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Biography: Brittany is a junior majoring in Human Biology at Stanford University.  She joined the lab in the Summer of 2007 and is currently working on characterizing the role of SUMO and its deconjugating enzymes in the intra-erythrocytic lifecycle of the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum

Alicia Berger
Graduate Student, Cancer Biology
bergera[at]stanford.edu
B.A. U.C. Boulder
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Biography: Alicia earned her B.A. degree in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry at University of Colorado, Boulder in 2003. During her undgraduate studies she worked in several research laboratories working on projects related to apoptosis, environmental microbiology and RNAi. She started as a Ph.D student in the Cancer Biology Program at Stanford in the Fall of 2003. She is currently working on a thesis project to develop and apply small molecule probes of caspases.

Steven Verhelst
Postdoctoral Fellow
verhelst[at]stanford.edu
M.S. Leiden University
Ph.D. Leiden University
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Website: http://www.wzw.tum.de/verhelst

Biography: Dr. Verhelst commenced his studies in chemistry, during which he did two internships. The first one, at the Leiden Institute of Chemistry under supervision of Prof. Dr. J. H. van Boom and Dr. H. S. Overkleeft, concerned the design and synthesis of novel sugar amino acids as conformationally rescricted dipeptide isosters. The second internship was performed at Harvard Medical School in the group of Prof. Dr. H. L. Ploegh and was directed towards the synthesis and evaluation of several protease inhibitors. He received his Masters degree in Chemistry cum laude from Leiden University. He carried out a Ph.D. in bio-organic synthesis under the supervision of Prof. Dr. J. H. van Boom, Prof. Dr. C. A. A. van Boeckel and Dr. G. A. van der Marel. His work involved the synthesis of analogs of aminoglycoside antibiotics. He received his Ph.D. from Leiden University in 2004. Currently, he is employed a post-doctoral fellow at Stanford University in the group of Dr. M. Bogyo, where he is working on the synthesis of serine and cysteine protease activity-based probes and their application as proteomic tools.

Shirin Arastu Kapur
Postdoctoral Fellow
shirinak[at]stanford.edu
B.S. Moravian College
Ph.D. Oregon Health & Sciences Univ.
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Biography: Dr. Kapur received a Bachelors of Science degree in chemistry with a minor in Biology in 1997 from Moravian College. She completed her Ph.D. studies in 2004 in the laboratory of Dr. Buddy Ullman at Oregon Health and Sciences University. Her thesis work was focused on functional studies of the inosine/guanosine nucleoside transporter from Leishmania donovani. She joined the Bogyo Lab in June 2004 and is currently working on functional studies of serine proteases in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

Ursa Pecar Fonovic
Research Associate
ursapf[at]yahoo.com
B.S. Univ. of Ljubljana
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Biography:Ursa received her Bachelors of Science degree in Biology from University of Ljubljana in 1997. She was awarded the Presern faculty prize for excellent research work. She received her Masters degree in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from the same University in 2000, working at Jozef Stefan Institute under the guidance of Prof. Dr. Borut Strukelj. She constructed different expression systems for steroidal-1-dehydrogenase in bacteria, yeast and plant. In 2001 she joined Department for Plant Protection at Agricultural Institute of Slovenia, where she ran the Diagnostic laboratory for plant pathogenic bacteria and developed methods for detecting GMO in corn. Ursa joined the group of Prof. Dr. Matthew Bogyo in June 2005 and is currently directing lab cell culture work and working on defining functional roles of cysteine and serine proteases in human parasites, Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum.

Amir Masoud Sadaghiani
Research Associate
feengil[at]stanford.edu
B.S. U.C. Davis
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Biography: Mr. Sadaghiani received a Bachelor of Science degree in Biochemistry and Molecular Cellular Biology from the University of California, Davis in 2003. During his undergraduate studies he worked as a Research Associate in the laboratory of Dr. Robert Fairclough in the Department of Neurology at UC Davis. Mr. Sadaghiani joined the laboratory of Dr. Matthew Bogyo at Stanford University in October 2004. He is currently working on the design and synthesis of libraries of small molecule protease inhibitors.

Marko Fonovic
Postdoctoral Fellow
mfonovic[at]stanford.edu
B.S. Univ. Ljubljana
Ph.D. Univ. Ljubljana
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Biography: Dr. Fonovic received a Bachelors of Science degree in chemistry from University of Ljubljana in 1998. He earned his Ph.D. in biochemistry and molecular biology in 2004 at the same university, working at Jozef Stefan Institute under the guidance of Prof. Dr. Vito Turk and Assist. Prof. Dr. Boris Turk. In 1999, he worked three months in Dr. Dieter Brömmes lab, at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York cloning, expressing and characterizing novel human cysteine proteases. In 2004 he joined the research group of Assist. Prof. Dr. Matthew Bogyo at Stanford Universitiy School of Medicine, where he is working on proteomic analysis of proteases in complex samples and the study of host-parasite interactions of Toxoplasma gondii.

Fang Yuan
Postdoctoral Fellow
chemyuanfang@yahoo.com
B.S. Jilin University
M.S. Nankai University
Ph.D. Nanjing University
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Biography: Dr. Yuan conducted his graduate work at Nanjing University in organometallic synthesis, asymmetric catalysis and multi-step organic synthesis. Dr. Yuan then worked as a post-doc in Professor Bing Xu at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. In the Xu Lab, he synthesized oligopeptides using solution and solid-phase chemistries, characterizing gelation rules by changing the peptide structures.

Kelly B. Sexton
Postdoctoral Fellow
kellymb[at]stanford.edu
B.S. Univ. Georgia
Ph.D. U.C. San Diego
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Biography: Dr. Sexton received her B.S. in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from the University of Georgia in 1999. She carried out her doctoral studies at the University of California, San Diego, where she worked in the laboratory of Professor Guy S. Salvesen at the Burnham Institute in La Jolla. From 2002 until 2004 she was funded by a dissertation fellowship from the California Breast Cancer Research Foundation. Her research focused on investigating the mechanisms of initiator caspase activation. For this work she was awarded the Molecular Pathology Excellence in Research Award in 2003. Dr. Sexton received her Ph.D. in the Fall of 2004 and has been a postdoctoral researcher at Stanford University in the laboratory of Professor Matthew Bogyo since this time. Her postdoctoral work involves the integration of protein biochemistry, enzymology and chemical proteomics to investigate pathways associated with human pathologies.

Daisuke Kato
Research Associate
daisukek[at]stanford.edu
B.S. U.C. Davis
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Biography: Mr. Kato received a Bachelors of Science degree in Biotechnology with a special emphasis in Biochemistry from the University of California, Davis in 2002. While working towards his undergraduate degree Mr. Kato worked as a Research Assistant in the Department of Biochemistry at UC Davis Medical School where he investigated the molecular mechanisms of polysialylation associated with human cancer metastasis and neural development. In 2003, Mr Kato joined the laboratory of Dr. Matthew Bogyo at Stanford University as Research Associate. While at the Boygo Lab, he worked on the synthesis and application of novel activity based probes for proteases. Currently, he is attending graduate school at the Scripts Research Institute.

Sukhjeet Batth
Undergraduate Researcher
sbatth[at]stanford.edu
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Biography: Sukhjeet is a junior majoring in Biological Sciences at Stanford University. He joined the lab in Spring of 2006 and is working on the design and synthesis of fluorescently quenched activity-based probes for caspases.

Christine Yang
Undergraduate Researcher
christine.yang[at]stanford.edu
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Biography: Christine is a junior at Stanford University. She joined the Bogyo Lab in the Spring of 2004. She is currently working on the analysis of falcipain I knockout of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.